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Aldo Cipullo
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Aldo Cipullo

Roman-born Aldo Cipullo, the son of a prominent Italian jeweller, began his apprenticeship in Italy before moving to New York in 1959 at the age of 23, where he studied at Manhattan’s famed School of Visual Arts. While working for David Webb and Tiffany, he showcased his talent for innovative design. He continued his career with Cartier, refining and simplifying his design sensibilities. His passion for modern living influenced his pure, clean designs.
In 1969, he created what seemed like a fairly simple gold bracelet, focusing on modern interpretations of ancient designs and legends. Inspired by the chastity belt, he called his design the “Love Bracelet” and suggested that couples buy two as it comes with a tiny screwdriver to take it on and off, symbolizing a "locked up," committed relationship. Cartier initially offered the bracelet exclusively to famous couples such as Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, and Nancy and Frank Sinatra. Cartier tells a story of a woman who showed up at a reception wearing nine Love Bracelets. She gave an explanation: "Listen, honey. I've had a few lovers in my time, and I made each one of them offer me a 'Love Bracelet'. For me, these nine bracelets are like the notches on a gunfighter's pistol!". The Love Bracelet became so popular it is still a bestseller at Cartier.
The playful side of Cipullo led him to use everyday objects like nails, knots, the dollar sign, and even games as the themes for his designs. For him, “to repeat the past is an easy way to get out of thinking, it’s an escape. The important thing is to reflect the present,” he says and adds, “All design is linked together”. He died at the age of 48 in New York City in January of 1984 after suffering two heart attacks.
   
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