A. E. Köchert
Aarne
Aldo Cipullo
Art Deco
Baugrand
Berlin Iron
Birks & Sons
Black, Starr & Frost
Blackamoor jewellery
Boivin
Bolin
Boucheron
Buccellati
Bulgari
Carl Wagner and Frédéric-Jules Rudolphi
Cartier
Castellani
Chaumet
Cusi
David Webb
Fabergé
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Gaillard
Giuliano
Harry Winston
Henri Picq
J.E. Caldwell
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JAR
Jérémie Pauzié
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Louis-David Duval
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Mellerio dits Meller
Morozov
Natural pearls
Oscar Heyman & Bros
Paul Legrand
Ravasco
Schlumberger
Sterlé
Tiffany & Co.
Van Cleef & Arpels
Verdura
Wièse
William Ruser
Fabergé

Jeweller to the Tsars, the House of Fabergé was founded in 1842 by Gustav Fabergé in St Petersburg. His son, Peter Carl Fabergé (1846-1920) gave the great impulse, creativity and technical fineness to the enamel works which are the house’s marks. Carl Fabergé joined his father’s workshop in 1861 after travelling in Europe where he completed his education, studying both manufacturing and design.

In 1870, he took responsibility for Fabergé’s workshops and was granted "Goldsmith by special appointment to the Imperial Crown" in 1885. In the meantime, Carl Fabergé created his first enamel Easter egg commissioned by Tsar Alexander III as a gift for his wife, Empress Maria Fedorovna. This special commission started a tradition of refined and inventive Easter eggs, very sought-after and sophisticated.

The House of Fabergé was awarded many times for their skilled jewels and works of art. They won their first gold medal at the Pan-Russian exhibition in St. Petersburg in 1882 and were awarded at the 1900’s Paris International Exhibition for their enamelled objects. They gained a worldwide clientele and opened stores in London and Paris. However, the 1917 Russian Revolution ended the firm’s production and the Fabergés fled for Switzerland. Peter Carl Fabergé died in Lausanne – Switzerland – in 1920.
   
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